Tuesday, May 6, 2014


End of an "Ice" Age:

In 1978, Gabe Mirkin, MD coined the term RICE. Health care practitioners to laypersons are quick to recognize RICE as the ‘gold standard’ treatment option following injury. Followers of my blog know my stance against ice and now there is support from the physician who coined the term. Yes, the very same physician, Dr. Gabe Mirkin, who coined RICE, is now taking a step back.

Coaches have used my “RICE” guideline for decades, but now it appears that both Ice and complete Rest may delay healing, instead of helping.” – Gabe Mirkin, MD, March 2014

Chinese medicine has been saying that ice deters healing and now after a couple thousand years the science has caught up and proves that using ice does indeed slow down healing. 

Here is a link to the full article with Dr. Gabe Mirkin: RICE: End of an Ice Age

To get more information about acupuncture and Chinese medicine:

www.johnsonchiu.com



Sunday, June 5, 2011

Your Allergy Medication Could Be Making You Fat

 Regular use of antihistamines has been linked to weight gain.

 Allergy season is upon us, and the record pollen levels we're experiencing this year may have you heading to the allergy relief aisle at your local drugstore. But what you take to alleviate your symptoms could have unpleasant side effects on your waistline. Researchers have suggested that allergies and weight gain go hand in hand, and that could have to do with the drugs you take or more subtle underlying problems.
In August 2010, researchers from Yale University published a study in the journal Obesity finding that people who took antihistamines regularly were heavier than people who didn't take them at all. The study's authors used data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC's) National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005–2006 to compare the body weight of 867 adults and their prescription antihistamine use. The two drugs most common in the study were cetirizine, now sold over-the-counter as Zyrtec, and fexofenadine, also now sold over-the-counter as Allegra, and the effect was more pronounced in men.

The researchers warned that this was an observational study, and couldn't demonstrate whether antihistamines actually caused the weight gain or if obesity predisposes people to allergies.


The latter was suggested in a separate study, published in 2009 in the Journal of Clinical Allergy and Immunology. Using data from the same CDC survey, researchers found that obese children were more likely to suffer from allergies, specifically food allergies, than normal-weight children. "It wasn't clear to us if that really meant that the obesity was the cause of that allergic propensity or not," says Cynthia Visness, PhD, the study's lead author and a research scientist at Rho Inc., the research firm that conducted the study.

For a healthier and more natural alternative to allergies, inquire about how acupuncture and Chinese medicine can help: www.johnsonchiu.com

The complete article can be found here:
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/43194176/ns/health-allergies_and_asthma/

Monday, January 3, 2011

5 Tips to Keep You Happy and Healthy in the New Year!


As we wash away 2010 and enter into 2011, keep in mind that it is still winter.  Here are 5 Traditional Chinese Medicine principles to keep you healthy and happy.  

1. Wrap up and stay warm: Sounds like common sense but in Traditional Chinese Medicine there are key areas you need to keep warm to avoid catching a cold. Keep your kidneys, knees, stomach and nape of your neck covered up as these are your most sensitive areas at this time of year and more susceptible to cold. This means that knees and lower backs can get sore, stomachs can get upset, and coughs and colds can be caught and may develop into more severe conditions like sinusitis or bronchitis.

TOP TIP: Try wrapping a scarf around your middle making sure to cover your kidney area and stomach when you feel cold instead of turning the heating up and see if you feel warmer. In Chinese medicine your kidneys are the centre of all energy and thus heat in your body and so this is a very effective way of keeping warm in the winter.

2. Eat more soups, stews, and broths: In China it is believed that in order to stay healthy one must live in tune with the seasons, and in fact your qi (energy) moves in tune with the energy of the earth. Sensible advice! If you look around you will see that animals are hibernating, foliage on plants and trees has started to diminish and wither, the days are drawing in and the nights getting longer. This is a time of yin an inward and contracting movement where qi begins to slow down and move inwards too. If you wish to stay healthy you need to support this movement by eating foods that warm, nourish and support the body. Slow cooked foods such as soups, stews, and broths full of root vegetables, beans, pulses, organic meat or meat substitute are ideal foods to support this movement.

TOP TIP: Two things to help with this in your busy life - a slow cooker with a timer (fabulous investment) as this can be left on whilst you are at work and when you get home voila - a nice hot nutritious meal is waiting for you, and, a flask to carry soup with you when you are on the go. This way you also know what is going into your food and don't have to worry about piling on the pounds through hidden sugars and salts in pre-packaged meals.

3. Slow Down: Whilst we live in a hectic and busy world, at this time of year we must also take into consideration our exercise habits. When you run outside in the cold and the rain you are taking that cold damp air straight down into your lungs which according to Chinese medicine creates ideal conditions for cough and cold viruses to take hold. If you must run outside in the cold or rain please make sure the areas mentioned above if not the whole body is covered up including wearing a hat to keep your head warm. If your happy to hang up your running shoes until it gets warmer then winter can be the perfect time for indoor sports instead and the more gentle the better.

TOP TIP: For those of you who like a little more exertion now is the perfect time for Bikram (Hot) Yoga but do be careful to re-hydrate slowly and sufficiently afterward.

4. Meditate: In winter it is more important than at any other time of year to get plenty of rest and take time out for yourself. Meditation can be an excellent way to calm the mind, relax the body and revive your energy. Even as little as 5 minutes a day can make a big difference to your health.

TOP TIP: Take 20 minutes out of each day if you can to lie down and allow the body to regenerate. In Chinese Medicine your Liver is responsible for the smooth flow of qi through your body this can be very difficult to maintain when faced with the barrage of stress that comes with modern living often resulting in conditions such as IBS, migraines, and anxiety. When you lie down you allow your qi and blood to return to your liver helping to soothe and nourish it.

5. Boost your Immune System: If you do feel a little sniffle or a cold coming on or are already in the midst of a terrible cold or flu then acupuncture can help by strengthening your immune system to protect you from further infections.

TOP TIP: Vitamin D aids our immune system in the elimination of cold and flu infections.  Our bodies naturally make vitamin D from exposure to the sun but during these winter months our exposure to the sun is minimize so by increasing vitamin D intake and also some acupuncture or Chinese herbs you can stay healthy during this cold and flu season.


Here is the link to the original article:
http://ezinearticles.com/?Five-Tips-to-Keep-You-Healthy-and-Happy-During-Winter&id=5470426

For further information about Acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine, contact your coastside licensed acupuncturist, Johnson Chiu at www.johnsonchiu.com



Wednesday, September 22, 2010

Cost of obesity?

Cost of obesity?

Over $4,000 if you're a woman

Study: Annual cost of being obese is $4,879 for a woman, $2,646 for a man

By LAURAN NEERGAARD

Associated Press

WASHINGTON - Obesity puts a drag on the wallet as well as health, especially for women.

Doctors have long known that medical bills are higher for the obese, but that is only a portion of the real-life costs

George Washington University researchers added in things like employee sick days, lost productivity, even the need for extra gasoline - and found the annual cost of being obese is $4,879 for a woman and $2,646 for a man.

That is far more than the cost of being merely overweight - $524 for women and $432 for men, concluded the report being released Tuesday, which analyzed previously published studies to come up with a total.

Why the difference between the sexes? Studies suggest larger women earn less than skinnier women, while wages don't differ when men pack on the pounds. That was a big surprise, said study co-author and health policy professor Christine Ferguson.

Researchers had expected everybody's wages to suffer with obesity, but "this indicates you're not that disadvantaged as a guy, from a wage perspective," said Ferguson, who plans to study why

Then consider that obesity is linked to earlier death. While that is not something people usually consider a pocketbook issue, the report did average in the economic value of lost life. That brought women's annual obesity costs up to $8,365, and men's to $6,518.

The report was financed by one of the manufacturers of gastric banding, a type of obesity surgery.

The numbers are in line with other research and are not surprising, said Dr. Kevin Schulman, a professor of medicine and health economist at Duke University who wasn't involved in the new report.

Two-thirds of Americans are either overweight or obese, and childhood obesity has tripled in the past three decades. Nearly 18 percent of adolescents now are obese, facing a future of diabetes, heart disease and other ailments.

Looking at the price tag may help policymakers weigh the value of spending to prevent and fight obesity, said Schulman, pointing to factors like dietary changes over the past 30 years and physical environments that discourage physical activity.

"We're paying a very high price as a society for obesity, and why don't we think about it as a problem of enormous magnitude to our economy?" he asks. "We're creating obesity and we need to do a man-on-the-moon effort to solve this before those poor kids in elementary school become diabetic middle-aged people."

A major study published last year found medical spending averages $1,400 more a year for the obese than normal-weight people. Tuesday's report added mostly work-related costs - things like sick days and disability claims - related to those health problems.

It also included a quirky finding, a study that calculated nearly 1 billion additional gallons of gasoline (3.8 billion liters) are used every year because of increases in car passengers' weight since 1960.

Copyright 2010 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

Sunday, September 12, 2010

More on Fruits & Vegetables


This article by Steven Reinberg - Health Day Reporter with Fox News is compelling...





The truth is consuming Fruits and Vegetables can extend your life and its quality. USDA recommends 7 to 13 daily servings, how difficult is that?

Juice Plus is an easy and convenient way to boost your intake of Fruits and Veggies and it’s inexpensive!


Learn more… http://www.sandrawhatmore.com/


Monday, August 16, 2010

Should you try acupuncture?


That depends on a variety of factors.  Most new people to acupuncture can usually be categorized into three groups:

1. Patients who have tried more familiar therapies without success, particularly for a chronic or recurring problem, are good candidates for acupuncture.

2. Someone who is reluctant to endure the side effects of some more conventional Western therapies.

3. The person who wishes to emphasize wellness and prevention over the disease model of medicine and is willing to make concomitant lifestyle changes to achieve optimum health.

The complete article can be found here:
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/arthur-rosenfeld/should-you-try-acupunctur_b_663421.html

For questions about acupuncture or to schedule and appointment please contact us at:
www.johnsonchiu.com

Monday, August 9, 2010

5 Fitness Myths You Need to Forget


By Reader's Digest Magazine, on Thu Jul 29, 2010
To be fit you need to stop letting myths like these hold you back.

1. Walking is not as effective as running.
Sure, you'll burn about twice as many calories running for 30 minutes than walking for 30 minutes. But if a runner and a walker cover the same distance, they burn about the same number of calories. So if you're willing to take the 'slow route,' you'll likely lose just as much weight. In fact, studies have proved that how long you exercise matters more than how hard you exercise.

2. Exercise increases hunger
It's a common misconception: If you burn hundreds of calories during a workout, you'll end up eating more. But research shows that exercise has no effect on a person's food needs, with the exception of endurance athletes who exercise for two hours a day or more. In fact, research shows that exercise often suppresses hunger during and after the workout.


3. It doesn't matter where your calories come from
Calories are not created equal. First, some foods (in particular, proteins) take more energy to chew, digest, metabolize, and store than others. Others (such as fats and carbohydrates) require fewer calories to digest and store. Second, different food types have different effects on your blood sugar. Refined carbohydrates (think white bread, cookies, and fruit drinks) raise blood sugar levels dramatically, which encourages fat storage, weight gain, and hunger. Fibrous foods like apples, as well as proteins, raise blood sugar less, making them friendlier to your waistline. Finally, foods that contain a lot of water, such as vegetables and soup, tend to fill the belly on fewer calories, so you'll stop eating them way before you stop eating more calorie-dense foods.


4. Diet alone is enough for sustained weight loss
You'll lose weight in the short term by slashing calories, but experts say exercise is what keeps pounds off for good. Exercise burns calories, of course. It also builds muscle, which takes up less space than fat. Muscle tissue also requires more calories to sustain it than fat tissue does. In other words, the more muscle tissue you have, the more calories you'll burn at rest. In fact, some studies suggest that over the long term, if you had a choice of eating consistently less or exercising consistently more, exercise would be the better weight-loss choice.


5. There is no best time for exercise
If you're simply walking to get healthy or take off some weight, it doesn't matter when you do it, as long as you do it. But if you're an athlete looking for the best-quality workout, choose the late afternoon, when body temperature is highest. Muscles are warm, reaction time is quick, and strength is at its peak. If you push yourself harder as a result, you will burn more calories.